Month: June 2016

Knowing More About the Evolution And The Concept Of The Digital Video Recorder

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Some believe that the best thing that happened to man kind most recently is the digital video recording ability. What exactly is a digital video recorder? It’s basically a device that can and may record digital video formats onto disks or other devices that could carry data.

The evolution of the digital video recorder came with devices like TiVo and Replay-TV. Microsoft also followed suit with devices of the sort. Studies show that TiVo was able to gain a lot of success with their digital video recorder.

The most commonly used digital video recorders in recent history come in software used on pc. All three major operating systems, Linux, Mac OS, and Microsoft windows support digital video recording programs. Windows media center is one good example.

A digital video recorder can vary from a portable music player to a hard disk based data collector. The new series of iPod Nano all carry digital video recording capabilities. Even the standard DVD R drive is a digital video recorder. This device is everywhere nowadays.

Also some illegal software is also freely available all over the internet. These usually stream videos or let people record videos onto their personal computers. But recent advancements in technology have brought it to a minimum.

Recent development has seen television sets being fitted with digital video recorder capabilities. LG brought this concept to the market in 2007. As a result of this feature, people are able to record their favorite television shows and store it for later use. The latest camcorders to hit the market have digital video recording facilities making recording and storing easier.

Although Digital video recording is used in PCs a lot, it is widely used in world as a satellite or cable TV tool. Recording shows or other video’s is a main theme brought forward by companies like TiVo or Dish Network. The concept of Digital video recorder has single handedly taken the Video cassette recorder which had a big following, completely out of the market.

The future is already here with the digital video recorder which is still relatively new to the world. But what most people don’t realize is that they are always in contact with one of these devices. When you’re using your computer or watching TiVo.

If you still don’t use a digital video recorder it is for the best that you get your hands on one right now. The possibilities are endless with this new technology. Enjoy your favorite videos over and over again, with the simple touch of a button.

If you love this article, you will also love another article written by this article’s author on wireless camcorder microphone and Canon digital video camcorder.

atop the piano
digital music recording
Image by Key Foster
the rest of my house looks like this- piles of books and paper and cables.

youtube.com/999blockkingz
cdbaby.com/all/blockkingz

In this video Lil’ D of Blockkingz Entertainment shares home recording tips on How digital music is tracked to pay music artists. Share this video with this link: http://youtu.be/pET1Ug8orzA

More Info on Isrc codes can be found at: http://www.isrc.org

Be sure to check out other videos from an artists’ perspective by subscribing to our you tube station at: youtube.com/999blockkingz

Lil’ D of Blockkingz Entertainment has a catalog of music to check out as well. Music is available on the website: cdbaby.com/all/blockkingz

Take Your Breath Away:

Table for 2

Just Me
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2fKYmi6ZLb4

No Threats No Fears

Hard to Walk Away

Heavens Gate
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kETujunDqgo

The video Playlist for this album “Code of Honor” can be seen Here:

The video Playlist for the album “Touch “D” Sky” can be viewed here:

The video Playlist for the album “Step Stones” can be viewed here:

The 10 Commandments of the Recording Artist playlist view here:

Using the Right Song Structure to make your Songs Fly

Check out these Videos:
US Vs. Them—-

Do You Create with Expectation—

More Digital Music Recording Articles

Getting Into Sound and Music Production – Making Your Own Studio at Home

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Are you planning to set up a music studio at home? Well, it is not as difficult to pull off as you might think. True, the number of equipments found scattered around the studio floor of a professional can look rather intimidating to a beginner. However, you will not need that much equipment to start recording your own music tracks.

So, what is needed to set up a beginner’s music studio?

First things first, make a checklist from the items given below. These are the equipments that you must have in your studio if you plan to do digital audio recording of any kind. It may be a tad expensive, but it will be very difficult to pull off a good work without these basic components. Here are the equipments that you simply cannot work without:

1. Microphones: Well, of course these are amongst the most important equipments in your starter setup. After all, how are you supposed to sing the vocals without a microphone? When you purchase one, make sure that it is compatible with digital audio equipment like amplifiers, and sound mixers. Besides, make sure what type of microphone you will need. If you are going to use acoustic guitars and similar high frequency music equipment, invest in a condenser microphone. Otherwise, a dynamic microphone will be cheaper and get you by.

2. Pre-amplifiers: These will help in amplifying the sound of the vocalist’s voice, automatically suppressing some of the background noises in the process. These are your second most important equipments after the microphones. High quality pre-amps can be real wallet-burners though, so keep your budget in mind when shopping for one.

3. Sound cards: You must have one of these if you wish to record music digitally. Go for a low priced one if you are a genius at using audio mixing software. However, if you are not that sure about using audio manipulating software, then it is best to go for the expensive varieties.

4. Computer: Well, of course, you will need a computer with sound cards and audio editing software installed, in order to digitally master the audio tracks you create. Besides, a computer makes the task of remixing a song a snap. However, if you do not wish to edit your own tracks in any way, then simply investing in a hard disk recorder will get the job done, for the time being. Remember though, you will have to live with the noises and disturbances in the background of your audio tracks.

5. Monitor speakers: No, these are not related to monitors that allow you to see what is happening in a computer. Monitor speakers allow you to listen to audio streams and spot discrepancies easily. Some experienced sound mixing professionals claim that they can get the job done with headphones, but it is more difficult to pull off without really good experience in the field.

6. Room acoustics: This is perhaps the most neglected part of an audio recording setup, even by some professionals. However, spending time and money over designing the inside structure of a proper studio is a worthwhile investment. Try not to skimp on this if you wish to do some serious audio recording in future.

These are the bare bone components of a music studio. A good home studio is a genuine asset for any budding musician. Build yours today, and start creating magic using your talent and skills.

Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Ghost Prayin
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Image by familymwr
Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Ghost Prayin

Photo By: SGT Pablo Piedra

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History

After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.
On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.
In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work… Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm…”
In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.
In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion …to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”
Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.
To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.
The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.
After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.
Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.
Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.
Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.
In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.
Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.
While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.
In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”
The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.
In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”
In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.
The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”
In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.
As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”
At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.
When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.
In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.
The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.
During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.
The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.
In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.
Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”
The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.
In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.
After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.
The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, engraving and trophy sales, etc… New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.
The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.
The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.
The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:
* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc…)
* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence…)
* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.
* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things …).
* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.
* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).
* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).
* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).
* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc…).
* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.
* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.
What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc… were far away places that most had not visited.
As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.
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The Beatles Songs Officially in Digital Format!

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Even while people knew this moment is almost certainly overdue, the announcement in November last year put the iTunes Store as the hot topic one more time: the Beatles Discography has exclusively really been added in the group of sounds purchaseable on iTunes. An afternoon immediately after Apple guaranteed “an appealing statement”, the awaited launching ultimately showed up: a complete set of The Beatles Songs popped up one soon after another within the iTunes archives, therefore was able to sell by the hundreds one hour immediately after its release.

Immediately after a great deal of negotiations, iTunes finally closed the deal with EMI, the master of a lot of the rock band’s records. Uploading the song catalogue over the internet really has not been an uncomplicated affair. The music band is acknowledged for their particular tracks’ exclusory nature – as an illustration, it is extremely infrequent for a Beatles tune to be utilized at a motion picture, or any other commercial venture. Exactly how much more just to take it to the Internet? Inevitably, nevertheless, the affection for music has taken precedence and tunes most notably “Twist and Shout”, “Yesterday” as well as complete compact disks are available in the Store for a quite inexpensive price tag.

There have been a handful of occasions wherein the Beatles’ records had been repackaged in modern yrs: an excellent release had been the The Beatles’ Anthology, 1, a compilation concept album that contains all their number one songs, which reached # 1 in thirty five places when it was basically revealed on Nov. of year 2000. Through this decade, 40 years following their known separation, the band continues to be reselling up to 30 million cds, which is really fantastic. Their travails on the digital world, nevertheless, are a lot more rare: just this ’09, EMI released special edition USB devices that housed pretty much all fourteen of the beatles’ recording studio cds. If you may have ever experienced Rock Band, you most likely have ever heard that the band per se was in fact featured at the video game, sold as “The Beatles: Rock Band”.

Having said that, lots of industry experts and critics consent where the music group’s entrance straight into digital format is right now a tad too late when compared with several other famous acts, particularly Elvis Presley as well as the Bee Gees. A few bloggers have listed that the Beatles’ launch wasn’t what newer fans are trying to find and is just not what the digital music market will need to bolster product sales. The delays in agreement are to a certain extent to be held accountable for this: it is often reported that Apple handled a really slow-moving procedure where the two remaining members, Sir Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr, and also the close family of the deceased legends George Harrison and John Lennon, in addition to the EMI company too, should be capable to get to a comprehensive agreement.

Even so, the introduction of the rock group’s records at iTunes is very thrilling headlines for all music addicts and for the World-wide-web age. This clearly is the better way to revisit the fab four’s records over and over, and to share this type of records into the newer generation of people, all of these are part of the digital age. It may have been a “long and winding road” for the world to get here, but it is official: The Beatles music are now purchaseable on the Internet.

Everytime someone listens to the might The Beatles songs , one can’t help but check the Beatles discography over again. TheBeatlesSongs.org has that list.

music was my first love
digital music recording
Image by cupitronic
Manche lieben immer noch diesen haptisch HARTEN Datenträger für ihren Eskapismusausflug. Ist digital besser? Ich sag ja, auch als Musikliebhaber.

Als in der Sonic Youth Ausstellung der Museumswärter sagte, man dürfte diesen Raum betreten, hab ich erstmal ganz schön schlucken müssen.

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Demand that Your Audio Recording Studio Has Solid Bamboo Floating Floors

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When you are looking to book an audio recording studio for your band to record in, one of the most essential things you will find it needs to have will be solid bamboo floating floors. In the studio, the overall sound that is produced in this room will have an impact on the recording, what you are going to find is that the acoustics that come with this form of flooring will actually help you to produce the highest quality sound possible.

With this, the right audio recording studio should have a digital audio convertor available to you. This is going to help you to effectively produce and mix your music, instead of having to combine master tapes into a seamless production. In fact, this digital music will allow you to make all the adjustments you need to create the perfect mix.

As part of the process, a solid microphone is going to be important as well. The source recording from this device is going to have a direct impact on the quality of your recordings. A cheap microphone is going to give you mediocre results. With that, you are going to find that no matter how good your editing software is. This means you should verify that any audio recording studio you choose should have a quality microphone in place to ensure that you have the foundation for a great recording.

Space will be another thing to consider when you are looking over your options. What you are going to find is that some recording studios are open enough that you and your band are going to be able to perform together in a single space and create a dynamic recording. In turn, you will also find that some recording studios can only fit so many people and their instruments in a room and you will need to plan for the adjusted space and break down the track into different layers. Some newer studios take advantage of having sound booths where instruments and vocals can be produced at the same time, while keeping each instrument localized so that you can adjust the power the instrument has on recordings.

No matter if you are planning on going the route of recording live or laying down tracks, your top priority should be on getting the best sound quality from the audio recording studio you choose. From the solid bamboo floating floors that can improve sound, to the technical aspects of the room, these simple things are going to help you to take your recording to the next level and to produce a higher quality album than you can make anywhere else. Because of that, take a moment to look at all the factors that come into play with the recording studio.

Liberty Studios is a Professional Audio Recording Studio in Toronto. It provides musicians, producers, filmmakers and editors with the resources for all their audio and visual production needs.

Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – A Cold Winter Day
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Image by familymwr
Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – A Cold Winter Day

Photo By: COL James Rentz

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History

After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.
On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.
In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work… Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm…”
In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.
In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion …to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”
Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.
To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.
The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.
After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.
Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.
Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.
Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.
In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.
Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.
While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.
In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”
The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.
In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”
In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.
The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”
In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.
As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”
At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.
When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.
In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.
The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.
During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.
The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.
In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.
Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”
The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.
In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.
After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.
The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, engraving and trophy sales, etc… New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.
The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.
The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.
The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:
* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc…)
* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence…)
* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.
* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things …).
* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.
* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).
* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).
* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).
* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc…).
* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.
* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.
What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc… were far away places that most had not visited.
As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.

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Related Digital Music Recording Articles

Music Business in China

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We live in a time where there are not only increasing amounts of people releasing music due to the internet and home production tools, but endless distractions for people on all sides. When music production peaked in the 1980′s, people had little else besides a TV and their music player or stereo to distract them. Now people have in their hand, mobile, internet, video games, video cameras, instant messaging, social networking, and endless super cool apps to keep them occupied. This makes it increasingly difficult to get attention for your music and art. More and more, to get people’s interest, you must have a great story! Only then they will be open and interested to listen to the music.

Now with new music production, promotion, marketing, sales and distribution, both within China and outside, to the existing Chinese artists through local office in Beijing, the industry is regaining its shape. Many other companies are now ready to offer music production services in China, some are based within China. The local office is staffed with bilingual locals who know the market and culture, and have experience working with Chinese and international artists there. These Companies have been legally registered as a Wholly Foreign Owned Enterprise in China. One of them is under the name ‘敬真堂(北京)文化咨询有限公司’ which translates to ‘Respect Truth (Beijing) Culture Consultancy Co. Ltd.’ (This was as close as to the English name given the language and cultural differences. It is kind of translation of the Chinese name, that mean ‘Church of Truth’)

There are many option in China for recording, audio production, music composition, mastering and sound design / film post production. Because China is a complex and daunting market for a foreign company, the music industry starting out with the following basic range of services for music production:

For Chinese artists:
* Focusing on getting Chinese artists who are ready exposure internationally
* Getting international distribution and sales for Chinese music.
* Promotion and marketing for Chinese artists overseas by connecting with interested markets and fans

For International Artists:
* Digital distribution for international artists in China.
* Promotion and marketing in China focusing on key social networking sites.
* Collaboration with Chinese artists and recording traditional Chinese instruments with local professionals

As continuous work is being done in researching the industry and experimenting with new techniques for promotion and marketing music in China, there will also be offering licensing for Chinese music internationally in Film, TV, and online, expanding their revenue sources. China is an important market backed up by the latest statistics. There are many offers for Chinese artists who are ready in creating their own business and develop music career in China, to maximize their profit and control.

To sum up, China is a huge, emerging market for the music industry, but currently in its infancy, and immature. Professional assistance is desperately needed due to crippling discouragement for artists attributed to the pervasive downloading of music. There is also a huge lack of ‘official’ presence for foreign artists who are becoming very popular in China. That means huge opportunity for those willing to support, develop and nurture this challenging market.

Pro Soul music recording studio & promotion companies in Beijing, China has a team of sound engineering professional provide services for music production, Sound Engineering China, audio mixing, sound mixing, music production and music promotion.

A Visit To Windmill Lane In Dublin
digital music recording
Image by infomatique
[Visit Photo Gallery]

Windmill Lane is covered in graffiti from fans who have paid pilgrimage from all over the world, many attracted by the studio’s historical connection with U2. Initially the graffiti was interesting but is now a terrible mess and the quality of the art is not as good as it was.

Windmill Lane Studios, also known as the "U2 studio", is a three-storey music recording studio located in Dublin, Ireland. It is located on Windmill Lane, a small street just south of City Quay and the River Liffey and a little north of Pearse Station. It was opened in 1978 by Brian Masterson who is a company director and head engineer. It was originally used to record traditional Irish music until U2 came along and began to record there. Prior to this, Irish rock bands such as Thin Lizzy or The Boomtown Rats carried out their recordings outside Ireland.

It is now boarded up, with the actual studios having moved elsewhere. Nevertheless, the studios are still a popular cult symbol and are regularly visited by tourists, particularly those originally from the United States.

Pulse Recording College recently took ownership of the studios. The college has previously sent students to work at Windmill Lane straight after graduation and these students have collaborated with 50 Cent, Bryan Adams, Moya Brennan, Donovan, Jon Bon Jovi and New Order.

The studio is no longer located on Windmill Lane, although it retains the name. Windmill Lane Studios has not been located on Windmill Lane for quite some time and the current facility was originally Ringsend Studios in Ringsend, Dublin 4. Plans to construct a six-storey office block on the old site led to criticism from local resident groups in early September 2008.

The studio remained empty from 2006 onwards, although reports circulated which linked Van Morrison with purchasing the studio for his own personal use that August. Morrison had previously recorded several albums there, including Back on Top, Magic Time and Pay the Devil. In January 2008, the studio was used to record "The Ballad of Ronnie Drew". In 2009, Pulse College took over Windmill Lane painstakingly renovating the studios which are internationally perceived as being at the heart of the Irish recording industry. The renowned multimedia college has now transformed the facilities with state-of-the-art equipment which encompasses not only 3 fully equipped recording studios, but also a creative hub for Digital Media Training in areas of Music Production, Film Production and Game Analysis and Design.

An audio interface lends quality to sound reproduction and MIDI music recording. Learn about interfaces and programs for recording MIDI music in Cubase in this free digital music recording video.

Expert: Kini Knox
Bio: Kini Knox has been working with MIDI for eight years. He went to school for Audio Recording and Engineering.
Filmmaker: MAKE | MEDIA
Video Rating: / 5

Generating Music With a Clavinova

Big Sur in the Morning

Nowadays we’ll talk concerning the Clavinova musical instruments from Yamaha. These are digital pianos that offer you the wealthy and round sound of child grand pianos for about a tenth with the cost. Numerous folks are picking digital pianos as they make a good deal of sense and get up significantly much less room than even an upright piano. They are also much less expensive and less hefty than even an upright piano but they are much richer in tone than a keyboard. And for this cause are much better suggested for people who are in fact learning to play the piano instead of just seeking to rift on the keyboard.

The Clavinova is a pioneering line of digital pianos produced by Yamaha. In styling and in style they look just like acoustic pianos but they are truly state from the art digital instruments that utilizes the leading edge technologies of Yamaha, along with the vast quantity of experience that they have in producing exceptional musical instruments. Because they are electronics units in the identical time they have an immense advantage over acoustic models of pianos specially with regards to modern day characteristics. A Clavinova piano can record songs and can make use of diverse voices, it could even be connected to a laptop or computer making use of a various sorts of connections including a wireless network.

All through the a long time because it’s got launched its digital piano line, Yamaha has been constantly producing improvements on its digital piano goods. One with the latest additions to this line will be the Yamaha CLP 320. Just when you thought the digital piano cannot get any greater, along comes this great new piano design. This really is an enhanced edition of the CLP 220. It has a range of 128 notes, a three level stereo sampling, and a damper. To believe the CLP 320 is just the beginners model on this line. That signifies that you are able to go for even more sophisticated types as you discover the best way to play.

1 from the greatest advantages that a digital piano has over an acoustic 1 could be the cost. The Yamaha CLP 320 price is by far reduced than that of a standard acoustic piano. So you could take pleasure in the exact same type of music at a much reduce value. As soon as you might have seen the Clavinova CLP 320 value tag at a retailer you may well decide to buy one appropriate away.

If you really are a music lover then a digital piano is 1 fantastic merchandise for you.

For more music tutorials visit us and join our friendly composer forum and expand your skill set.

Big Sur in the Morning
digital music recording
Image by Stuck in Customs
Destination Google!
On Monday Feb 1, I’m speaking at Google for their Authors@Google program. The whole thing will be recorded, so I’ll be able to share it back with the world here once it goes up. You can find out more by following @GoogleTalks. And thanks to Mike Wiacek @MikeWiacek who is the head of the Google Photog Club and to Cliff Redeker @mcrsquared for getting the whole thing set up… I am excited!

Later that afternoon, I’m giving a private photography workshop to people at Google back in one of their secret rooms… That should be a lot of fun too. I’ll be going through, in person, what I have in the HDR Tutorial here on the site.

There is a public photowalk and talk on Thursday, Feb 4 at Stanford. We’ll meet at 4 PM at the The Oval, and then meet at 5:30 in one of the auditoriums for the talk.

Private Tour at Hearst Castle
I’m driving up the coast towards Silicon Valley, and I decided to take my time and leisurely drive up Highway 1. I’m doing my best to fill the trip with planned and unplanned adventures.

I spent a big chunk of the day up at Hearst Castle. I was given a private tour whilst guarded by one of LAPD’s finest, who is now a security guard at the castle. I had carte blanche to go anywhere and shoot everything – it was totally amazing! I got into the wine cellar, into the top two spires where there are tiny bedrooms, and all over the place. It was just amazing — I have not had time to process the photos yet… but… you won’t believe it!

Daily Photo – Big Sur in the Morning
5:30 AM. Alarm goes off. It’s always painful. People that say they are "morning people" — I think they are lying. But, when in a beautiful place, I always force myself, military style, to pop out of bed. There are hikes to be made and photos to take!

I stayed at the Ragged Point Inn. My room had a little fireplace and everything (which made it even harder to get out of bed!). After I got downstairs, I started a little hike to get a good vantage of the coast and the sunrise. Of course, there was a fence blocking the best bit, so I jumped over it like Carl Lewis (a much older, whiter, and less jumpy Carl Lewis), and edged along the rocky coast to get a good spot. I forgot to put on my hiking shoes and mistakenly donned my Cole-Haans while in the dark. Big mistake. Those don’t make for good hiking shoes, especially after five minutes of getting soaked in morning dew from the foliage I was ripping my way through.

But, I had on my earphones and was blasting away music… all was good… the sun came up, the clouds were perfect, and I took this photo.

from Trey Ratcliff at www.stuckincustoms.com