Month: March 2016

Prospects Of US Music Gear Industry

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When we talk about the music gear industry, we mean the businesses and organizations that record, produce, publish, distribute, and market recorded music. The music publishers, recording industry, and the record production companies have a great impact in molding the US music gear industry.

The growing music industry in the US has enhanced the growth of music gear industry in many ways. There are a number of establishments engaged in the retail sales of musical gear. As the music industry grows hand in hand with technology the demand for their products also grows. The total market share of these musical instruments is about 69% of the overall marketplace.

With the changing trends in the music industry with regard to new genre music that requires techno sound, computer software is made use of to facilitate playback, recording, composition, storage and performance. There are a number of online communities of composers, performers, teachers and manufacturers who have an interest in making or supporting music making with computers.

The growth in the music gear industry has brought about the sequencer software, which is the widely used form of software in music technology. This device allows you to record audio MIDI musical sequences.

The music gear commonly found in a recording studio includes the mixing console, Multitrack recorder, microphones and the reference monitors which are loudspeakers with a flat frequency response. And in recent years these equipments include Digital Audio Workstation, music workstation and outboard effects such as compressors, reverbs and equalizers.

Musicians and composers all along had a desire to integrate stereos, turntables, recording equipments, MIDI keyboards and even electric guitars with computers. The music gear industry soon witnessed a serious computer-based composition with the Atari ST, Amiga and Mac computer systems. Technologists continue to seek more integrated, easier to use and higher performance tools for audio creation tasks. Many current Digital Audio Workstations even support integration with video streams allowing full production.

There is a great development in every sphere of the music gear industry. The developments of new versions of music gear are on the rise as competition is also high. Specialized manufacturers are coming up with new improved versions of music gear.

Some of the latest equipments in the music gear industry are described in the following paragraphs.

The multi track recorder is ideal for a high-quality digital recording studio, with amazing Zoom MRS-802BCD Digital Multitrack Recording Studio with CD burner. It offers eight mono tracks, a discrete stereo track for its drum machine, great zoom effects, and full mixing, editing and CD burning capabilities.

The best selling studio mixer is the Phonic MU802 8-input Compact Audio Mixer. This mixer is known as the box that rocks in the music gear industry as it is designed for both studio and live performances. The Soundcraft Gigrac 1000 studio mixer lets you fine-tune your sound with 1000 watts of power, digital quality effects and a 7-band equalizer for each channel.

Another equipment in the music gear industry that has made a lot of difference in audio recording is the high quality studio monitor. One of the best selling products now is the Samson Resolv 65 Studio Monitor and Fostex PMO 5.5 inch Active Studio Reference Monitor, ideal for remote and small project studios.

Here, we have seen the latest and the top quality equipments that can produce optimum output. This may cost a little more but it is economical. Buying the latest product will save you from all the hassles of upgrading your recording system every now and then. These developments have tremendous impact on the quality of the performane.

Victor Epand is an expert consultant for music gear, speakers, and microphones. You can find the best marketplace for music gear, speakers, and microphones at these 3 sites: Prospects of U.S music gear industry, , speakers, subwoofers, and microphones.

A Visit To Windmill Lane In Dublin
digital music recording
Image by infomatique
[Visit Photo Gallery]

Windmill Lane is covered in graffiti from fans who have paid pilgrimage from all over the world, many attracted by the studio’s historical connection with U2. Initially the graffiti was interesting but is now a terrible mess and the quality of the art is not as good as it was.

Windmill Lane Studios, also known as the "U2 studio", is a three-storey music recording studio located in Dublin, Ireland. It is located on Windmill Lane, a small street just south of City Quay and the River Liffey and a little north of Pearse Station. It was opened in 1978 by Brian Masterson who is a company director and head engineer. It was originally used to record traditional Irish music until U2 came along and began to record there. Prior to this, Irish rock bands such as Thin Lizzy or The Boomtown Rats carried out their recordings outside Ireland.

It is now boarded up, with the actual studios having moved elsewhere. Nevertheless, the studios are still a popular cult symbol and are regularly visited by tourists, particularly those originally from the United States.

Pulse Recording College recently took ownership of the studios. The college has previously sent students to work at Windmill Lane straight after graduation and these students have collaborated with 50 Cent, Bryan Adams, Moya Brennan, Donovan, Jon Bon Jovi and New Order.

The studio is no longer located on Windmill Lane, although it retains the name. Windmill Lane Studios has not been located on Windmill Lane for quite some time and the current facility was originally Ringsend Studios in Ringsend, Dublin 4. Plans to construct a six-storey office block on the old site led to criticism from local resident groups in early September 2008.

The studio remained empty from 2006 onwards, although reports circulated which linked Van Morrison with purchasing the studio for his own personal use that August. Morrison had previously recorded several albums there, including Back on Top, Magic Time and Pay the Devil. In January 2008, the studio was used to record "The Ballad of Ronnie Drew". In 2009, Pulse College took over Windmill Lane painstakingly renovating the studios which are internationally perceived as being at the heart of the Irish recording industry. The renowned multimedia college has now transformed the facilities with state-of-the-art equipment which encompasses not only 3 fully equipped recording studios, but also a creative hub for Digital Media Training in areas of Music Production, Film Production and Game Analysis and Design.

What to Look for in a Digital Music Player

For many people, having a digital music player isn’t just a handy solution, it’s a lifestyle choice. A lot of people depend on quality digital music players that offer the best of all worlds, on a budget in a tight economy. When you are looking for a digital music player, you want something that is jam packed with features, and offers you all of the benefits you need to meet the demands of your lifestyle. All on a budget as well of course. When you are looking for a digital music player, the bottom line is you want one that is going to solve your problems, not create new ones. Here is how you should look for the best digital or free music player for you.

Digital music comes in a variety of formats today, and not every format is compatible with every music player on the market. So, you need something where you can download all of your favorite music, and not worry about what format you are getting it in, or have to worry about checking for compatibility. There is nothing more frustrating that downloading your favorite song only to find out it is not compatible with your music player. Who wants to spend the time converting all of their favorite audio files when you’ve just spent the time downloading them? Nobody. You want a digital music player that offers compatibility with at least fifteen different audio formats, from MP1 to MP3, WAV, WMA, and all of the others that you love to download.

If you plan on using your audio files, like for the long awaited recording of your child’s first words, and playing with them to create exceptional audio clips to share with the entire family here and overseas, then you also want a digital audio player that offers you a graphics equalizer with built in sound effects. For those in the entertainment business or music industry, having an 18-band equalizer is essential in mastering the perfect clip. In other words, if you are using your audio player for more than playing music, you want something with an equalizer that offers you built in sound effects that you can play with to create the audio files that will turn people’s heads when they hear them. In addition to that, you want good quality sound. So a high bit audio processing feature such as a 32-bit audio processing is going to be a must have for you.

To every person, their experience with music is, well, personal. So you want to have a music player that you can customize. You may want to addin additional plug ins such as DSP from WinAmp, Input, or Gen. Or you may simply want an intuitive interface that is easy for you to work with. Maybe you even just want to listen to your music through your computer while you fall asleep, but need to customize it to turn off at a certain time. Features that allow you to make your music player your own are also a must have for anyone that wants a music player.

When it comes to your music, you need a digital music player that is well organized and can offer you multiple play list storage, bookmarks, a playback queue, and an audio library. You also want something that is customizable to you, can work with a variety of formats, and is easy to use. There is the right audio player for everyone, if you spend the time researching the music player that is as personal as your tastes in music.

If you are looking for a free music player that answers all of your problems from previous music players, download your free music player today!

More Digital Music Recording Articles

A Music System Should Be Able To Support Extra Speakers

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You do not need to have costly digital music recording systems for homes where the requirement is only of listening to music. A little planning and forethought towards the present as well as the future requirements will enable you to decide on the type of music system you will need.

Most speaker sets use an FM radio transmitter, which can transmit sound from up to 300 feet away. The signal goes through walls, furniture, and other obstacles. The music fan needs only to connect the transmitter to the audio device in order to be able to use the speaker.

Wireless speakers work just as well as traditional speakers do. Music fans will not lose much in the way of sound quality. You can also learn about the price of the gadgets from the various websites. A buyer can also choose from the different models available. It is then possible for them to buy music systems that are the best.

Moreover, the players are compact and can be accommodated easily at any place in a room. It just covers a little space and so the users find it very convenient to mount the device in a room. Moreover, being compact, it can be easily carried from one place to another. People find the mobility of the gadgets very appealing.

You can also learn about the price of the gadgets from the various websites. A buyer can also choose from the different models available. It is then possible for them to buy music systems that are the best.

A simple CD player or MP3 player is enough if it is to be heard only in one room. Such a player can also be used outdoors if it has battery facility attached and will be handy for family picnics. However, in order to cater to a number of rooms in the house a bigger system will be needed.

Learn more about Sonos S5 All-In-One Wireless Music System (White). Stop by Joe Kidson’s site where you can find out all about Sonos S5 All-In-One Wireless Music System (White) and what it can do for you.

Can you hear me now?
digital music recording
Image by Jeffrey
My music on my phone.

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In today’s video, I explain the differences between analong and digital recordings. Share and enjoy.

Daily Guru Logo By: Alex Binder
Video Rating: / 5

Building a Simple Recording Studio for Beginners

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This article contains introductory information on what the basic components of a recording studio are. It outlines the use of the multi-track recorder, the microphone, the studio monitor, the console and finally the mixing console.

There is a huge selection of gear to choose from when wanting to record music. Sound quality is very important when recording music so the recording musician can select the right equipment for getting the best sound. To do so however, to get the best quality in creating and recording music you need to know a few details regarding various recording gear.

To start, someone who is looking to record music professionally should have some short of multi-track recorder. You can either have an analog multi-track recorder that takes a tape or a digital multi-track recorder that has a digital tape; digital tapes similar to zip drivers. Nevertheless, the analog tape recorders are usually the cheapest recorders out there as well. The recently popular multi-track recorder is the one that uses a hard drive.

This type of multi-tracker recorder is based on a computer hard drive that you can save your music and channel configuration on. Depending on the make of the digital multi-track recorder the size of the hard drive varies and so does the amount of information that you can save on. In addition, some hard drives can also be upgraded and to have more memory.

Before you start recording you need to get the sound to the recorder from the source. A microphone is a basic and most common way to do so. A microphones utility depends on a few factors but in general microphones are categorized based on quality and consistency.

Quality of sound is one thing but the second one is consistency which is also important. Consistency has to do with the perception of sound as well as for the eventual usage of the sound. Moving on to other things you will need to record music, is to have a way to listen to what is being recorded in the studio.

These types of studio speakers are referred to s studio monitors or reference monitors. These speakers are specially designed for music production and are very accurate. They are made to give out highly detailed overall sound without focusing on a particular frequency.

After the multi-track recorder, a microphone and a monitor you will also need a mixer. A mixer is an audio device that can either be digital or an actual piece of electronic equipment. What a mixer does is mixes signals. It mixes the audio inputs into viable audible sound wave entities that can be manipulated in way that can be altered around for the best levels.

A mixer works great in bringing all your studio components together and allows the recording professional to control the audio levels as well as connect other instruments and studio components. A mixer supports audio mixing consoles that allow you to alter the tone dynamics of more than one audio signal at the same time.

Aside from the above the recording professional will also need a variety of cables, connectors and other kinds of recording equipment. A good sound engineer also needs a good pair of headphones so you can monitor everything closely.

It is not hard to start your own studio. These days it can be achieved very easy and at a low budget.

If you are interested in setting up your own studio then visit Music Recording Equipment. Get information on headphones such as the Sony mdr-v900dj DJ Monitor Headphones. You should also get a turntable like the Ionaudio Vinyl Recording USB Turntable .

24/96
digital music recording
Image by jDevaun.Photography

The Rise of Digital Music and the Fall of the Music Store

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There was a time when music stores ruled the airwaves. You could not go one mile in a city and not come across one, and the parking lot was always full. Then came online digital music. Now you can not find hardly a single music store that exists solely on the back of CDs and music sales. They have to sell other things to even survive. Why is this? Is digital music and online music really that much better? Here are several reasons why online digital music has overtaken the music stores of the world.

One easy reason that online music is superior to music stores is cost. You can download a great deal of music online at very little cost, and that is impossible to compete against. Even with iTunes and other MP3 downloads, you are still paying a pittance in comparison to CD prices. Downloading music is much cheaper than buying an entire CD.

Selection is another reason online digital music is superior. You can literally pick and choose among the songs you like, and only buy what you like. It used to be you had to buy the entire CD, and usually only liked one or two songs. With MP3 downloads, you can make your own mixed CD of sorts digitally, and have only the best of your music in a snap. Selection is awesome with digital music.

Portability is another huge thing with digital music. Remember when you got your first Walkman? How can that possibly compare with MP3 players and iPods? It can not. For example, you would have to carry not only the bulky CD player, but you would also have to carry 300 CDs around with you as well to match what your iPod can carry in most cases. Who would choose to do that?

Finally, sound is another factor. CDs always skipped it seemed, regardless of how you were listening. You would make one wrong move in the car or in your bedroom, and your CDs were skipping and getting scratched. With MP3 players and iPods, you need not worry about such things. Your music will be crystal clear regardless of how many Kevin Bacon “Footloose” dance steps you might make while listening. You need not ever worry about a scratched CD, as the music is digitally recorded. That same digital recording will also ensure that the music is reproduced in a perfect way. There is no better sound on Earth than digital music.

Online digital music is so vastly superior to CDs that it is likely the CD will go the way of the 8-track. There is simply no good reason to have CD around except to keep copies of your music as backups. Even that can be done more economically by putting them on your computer. Digital music is the wave of the future, and every person that listens to music will benefit from it over time. What is so exciting about online digital music is that we have only scratched the surface of what is possible. I remember when CDs were the latest craze and look at them now. What will be on the market in 2020? I can’t wait to find out.

Jason Bacot – I get it now, looks like you’re still searching online for that one of a kind Music and those awesome mp3 downloads, well, you don’t have to look much further because Big Pond Music has it all.

A Visit To Windmill Lane In Dublin
digital music recording
Image by infomatique
[Visit Photo Gallery]

Windmill Lane is covered in graffiti from fans who have paid pilgrimage from all over the world, many attracted by the studio’s historical connection with U2. Initially the graffiti was interesting but is now a terrible mess and the quality of the art is not as good as it was.

Windmill Lane Studios, also known as the "U2 studio", is a three-storey music recording studio located in Dublin, Ireland. It is located on Windmill Lane, a small street just south of City Quay and the River Liffey and a little north of Pearse Station. It was opened in 1978 by Brian Masterson who is a company director and head engineer. It was originally used to record traditional Irish music until U2 came along and began to record there. Prior to this, Irish rock bands such as Thin Lizzy or The Boomtown Rats carried out their recordings outside Ireland.

It is now boarded up, with the actual studios having moved elsewhere. Nevertheless, the studios are still a popular cult symbol and are regularly visited by tourists, particularly those originally from the United States.

Pulse Recording College recently took ownership of the studios. The college has previously sent students to work at Windmill Lane straight after graduation and these students have collaborated with 50 Cent, Bryan Adams, Moya Brennan, Donovan, Jon Bon Jovi and New Order.

The studio is no longer located on Windmill Lane, although it retains the name. Windmill Lane Studios has not been located on Windmill Lane for quite some time and the current facility was originally Ringsend Studios in Ringsend, Dublin 4. Plans to construct a six-storey office block on the old site led to criticism from local resident groups in early September 2008.

The studio remained empty from 2006 onwards, although reports circulated which linked Van Morrison with purchasing the studio for his own personal use that August. Morrison had previously recorded several albums there, including Back on Top, Magic Time and Pay the Devil. In January 2008, the studio was used to record "The Ballad of Ronnie Drew". In 2009, Pulse College took over Windmill Lane painstakingly renovating the studios which are internationally perceived as being at the heart of the Irish recording industry. The renowned multimedia college has now transformed the facilities with state-of-the-art equipment which encompasses not only 3 fully equipped recording studios, but also a creative hub for Digital Media Training in areas of Music Production, Film Production and Game Analysis and Design.

Related Digital Music Recording Articles

Working Out What You Need for Your Home Recording Studio

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An important consideration when looking to set up a ‘home recording studio’ is how you will use it. You will need to work out how many things you want to record or plug in at any one time or you might wind up with uneccessary gear-or not enough!

Let’s look at a typical example of ‘Vinnie’ the guitarist who has a desire to show his ‘band’ how the songs should be played.

No matter how many times he’s tried to explain, they never quite get it right, so the only way he can see to achieve this is to record it all ‘properly’ himself.

What does Vinnie need?

He needs to record a basic drum pattern – nothing fancy – he wants to record two electric guitars, an acoustic guitar, he wants to record a bass guitar and record a main vocal and two backing harmonies.

Vinnie of course will not do all this at once, so even though he needs to record 9 things does he need 9 channels?

No.

All he really ‘needs’ is a maximum of 4 inputs- two with pre-amps. He will also need a microphone to sing into and to record his acoustic guitar, we will asume he has a guitar amp simulator to record the electric guitars and bass and that he has a physical drum machine or one inside his computer or stand alone hard disc recorder.

Vinnie could easily walk down to his music store or get online and find what he needs to get the job done. He could look at a computer recording package with appropriate software and specialised sound card for audio recording. Some companies provide these all in one packages Lexicon, M-Audio, Pro-Tools and Presonus are good brand names to look at as a starting point, but be aware that recording onto a computer can be a frustrating experience if you’re not computer savy.

Vinnie’s other alternative is the stand alone hard disc recorder with a built in mixer section. Any of the offereings from Fostex, Yamaha or Boss/Roland would take care of his needs, at this point Vinnie just wants to get his ideas onto the physical plain as quickly as possible so others can hear them- so he’ll probably need a CD burner thrown in to the equation unless his machine can link up to a computer-as a number of them now can do.

Now let’s look at another example of Barabra who plays in a four piece folk/rock group. They want to record a couple of songs for CD release. All the instruments her band uses are acoustic; Double Bass, Violin ,Guitar and Banjo.

Three of the group also sing. Now Barabara is lucky enough to have a large secluded garage space available for her group to rehearse in and given they don’t annoy the neighbours by making too much noise she wishes to record the band as a ‘whole’ for the best vibe-what will she need?

4 X Instrument Microphones or D.I. [direct injection] boxes
3 X Vocal microphones
8 inputs with Microphone Preamps
Capacity to record on 8 channels at once.

There are some limitations with stand alone recorders, some of them will only let you record on 2 channels at once, another thing to be aware of is the ‘quality’ of the recordings.

Some years ago during the ‘compression algorythm’ wars, clever boffins discovered that our ears can ‘fill in’ missing information, in the same way that you can look at the scrambled letters of a word but are still able to decipher what it is.The boffins kept removing bits of what our ear was hearing until they came up with a formula [algorythm] that fooled our ears most of the time. These are known as ‘compressed’ formats as they ‘squish’ the sound in such a clever way that we don’t notice.

Almost all commercial and home recording computer software will record ‘linear'[non-compressed] files to your computer hard disc. Pro-tools,Logic Audio, Cubase, Sonar all do this. Later on when you ‘mix-down’ your songs you can turn them into mp3 files for podcast or to load to your portable digital music player. Adobe Audition and Steinberg’s Wavelab are two programs I can think of that record direct mp3 files- but they are not ‘full function’ multitrack programs.

When we deal in compressed formats- mp2 mp3 etc, ‘unneccessary’ information is removed making the file sizes smaller [and hence downloads faster]- so these are ‘compressing’ the files. The advantage for the home recordist is that less hard disc space is needed.

A consideration when looking at stand alone recorders is to ask the question- do I want compressed or uncompressed audio. If you have any intention of turning these recordings into something for release then the uncompressed format is the best- you will lose some quality by using a compressed format, but your ideas will be captured quickly for you to work on later. Also bear in mind that a number of hard disc recorders can later transfer data to a computer software system for more elaborate processing so if you use a non-compressed recording format you will retain the quality of your recording.

Now when Barabara popped down the music store to express her needs she told the sales person that, “she wants a high quality recording of her group but I have no idea about computers” so the salesman suggests a stand alone unit with eight inputs that records the data in a non-compressed format. As she doesn’t have a huge budget she chooses to hire in most of the microphones for this recording session. The man at the shop suggests she uses condensor microphones for the instruments and dynamic Shure sm58’s for the vocals.

A crucial quality consideration at this point is the ‘pre-amp’. What does that do and why is it so important you ask?

After your microphone has done the incredible job of sorting out sound pressure waves and converting them into electrical signals, they arrive via microphone cables at the ‘pre-amp’-a short way of saying pre-amplifier. For years I struggled to really ‘get’ what a pre amp did, unitl I understood this:

When the microphone puts out a signal it is very very very very tiny. I now call this ‘mouse level’. Once it’s gone through a pre amp it becomes ‘elephant level’, something that our mixing consoles and digital recorders can use easily.

Hear this:

Depending on the quality of the compoments used, this amplification process can make or break the quality of the recorded sound. A bad pre-amp will add hiss and noise to your recording

Most stand alone recorders and computer sound card interfaces have ‘adequate’ microphone preamps. To make your recordings ‘shine’ I would suggest getting an ‘outboard'[separate component] pre-amp, though having said that the pre-amps in high end Yamaha consoles are gaining a very good reputation. Focusrite/Joe Meek/Avalon/Tc Electronics are great brands. Currently I use a Focusrite Twin-Trak pro, a device specifially for home recording enthusiasts.

To sum up, our friend Vinnie will probably be quite happy with an off the shelf hard disc recorder with 4 or so inputs that records ‘compressed’ files because he is only trying to show his band colleagues a ‘rough’ idea of how he hears things.

Barbara who is not computer savy is looking for a more polished end product and wants to record her group in the best quality for a CD the band will release, hence she needs to record ‘linear’ [non-compressed] data and will look for a unit with the best quality pre-amps she can buy.

For more information on home recording visit www.myhomerecordingstudio.com
Download 100 free money making eBooks at mymillionairebuddy.com

Window Like
digital music recording
Image by trekkyandy
I know it’s out a window for real but the song is "Window Like" which explains the title. I recorded this on 4/22/08. I wasn’t sure if I was going to post it or not but decided to post it tonight. I used my Logitech ClickSmart 510 digital camera/webcam to record the video onto the hard drive. The colors aren’t the best because the camera sucks. I recorded for over an hour while I washed the dishes and cooked supper.

Music is "Photo theme: Window like" by Antony Raijekov

Related Digital Music Recording Articles

What Do You Need To Get Started In Recording?

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The innovations that have been brought about since the advent of digital music recording have changed much in the recording industry. One of these big changes is that it is easier than ever for musicians to record themselves rather than go into a studio. If you are looking to record on your own, you can set up a home studio and start working towards putting together a CD. What follows is some of the “must have” equipment to get started with a home studio.

A computer and software – There’s a lot of different software out there for the purposes of recording. Regardless of which software package you pick to use in your home studio, you will need something. You’ll find that this will become the center of your home studio. You’ll need a relatively powerful computer with a lot of RAM and a large hard drive so that you can easily store and work with your recordings.

Foam – Soundproofing is important. The echo which can occur in some rooms can ruin your recordings. Using soundproofing foam will deaden the sound in this room, which depending on size and shape may only need to be partially soundproofed to provide you with the echo dampening you need for your home studio.

A mixer – You’ll need this to get the sound from the instruments and voices to your computer. You’ll need a mixer with enough channels to handle everything you want to record all at once (it is a good idea to get a mixer with a few more channels than you think you will need).

Pre-amps – These will give your instruments much better sound than can be achieved by running them directly into the mixing board. You can set the sounds of instruments individually using pre-amps, offering you much more control over your recording.

Monitors – While some prefer headphones for this purpose, you may want to consider some high quality full range monitors; these will let you hear the full dynamic range of your recording during the mixing phase, if you do opt for headphones instead of monitors, be sure to use headphones specifically designed for the purpose.

Microphones – You’ll want high end microphones for recording which will capture the full range of voice and other sounds recorded in the room. For voice recording you’ll want a pop filter – this prevents hard consonants from overloading your recording.

Compression – This can be done either by a separate compression unit or after recording, but shouldn’t be neglected. Compression allows you to limit the peaks and valleys of sounds and match these peaks between different tracks.

Using this basic setup will allow you to create good sounding recordings from the get go. You can add in other equipment as you go on, or take out equipment you find yourself not using, but the equipment listed above will get you off to a good start with your home studio.

Kevin Sinclair is the publisher and editor of MusicianHome.com, a site that provides information and articles for musicians at all stages of their development.

Low-Tech Suzuki Melodion – Ottawa 01 08
digital music recording
Image by Mikey G Ottawa
Nowadays, with modern technology, You could record (‘sample’) any instrument (like say, a trumpet) or Any Sound Imaginable, even! Next minute, you’re playing that sound, automatically transposed across the 96, touch-sensitive keys while also simultaneously recording your performance as MIDI performance data in a computer-controlled sequence of performance instructions at 496 kHz, in stereo . . . .
or you could play The Melodica.
It’s cheap and easy.

See Mikey G Ottawa’s Flickr Photo Set of my visit to Spaceman Music in Centretown Ottawa on Gladstone Avenue at Bank Street. www.flickr.com/photos/mikeygottawa/sets/72157603698127445…
.